๐ŸŽฐ 12 things to keep in a safe at home, not at a bank - CBS News

Most Liked Casino Bonuses in the last 7 days ๐Ÿ”ฅ

Filter:
Sort:
A67444455
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
50 xB
Max cash out:
$ 200

Safe Deposit Box: A bankโ€™s safe deposit box is secured in a bank vault under double lock, and access usually requires a photo ID. The box itself is under certain legal protections, such as preventing others from accessing it upon your death. The vault itself offers a stronger measure of protection than a portable box in your home, but.


Enjoy!
Home Safe vs Safety Deposit Box - new-fit.ru
Valid for casinos
Home Safe vs Safety Deposit Box - new-fit.ru
Visits
Dislikes
Comments

CODE5637
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
60 xB
Max cash out:
$ 200

Safe Deposit Box vs. Personal Safe A personal safe, on the other hand, is normally a smaller object located in the home or office of the owner (the larger the box, the more it costs). If not permanently mounted to a solid concrete floor, the safe is subject to being removed from the property with its contents.


Enjoy!
12 things to keep in a safe at home, not at a bank - CBS News
Valid for casinos
12 things to keep in a safe at home, not at a bank - CBS News
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities I'm curious what other bogleheads think about home safes vs safety deposit boxes.
I currently have both but I'm always worried about losing the little safety deposit box key or how my heirs would get into the box.
More for fire protection cash lock box slot theft I guess as thieves could use a just click for source cart to just walk out with it.
My specific questions are the following: 1.
If you have a home safe, what type is it?
What documents do you put in your home safe vs your safety deposit box?
I am thinking about looking into getting a much better safe installed at the house.
Not for valuables so much as documents and things I just don't want to ever lose.
This is Texas and we have concrete slab foundations.
So the best solution would seem to be to have a higher end fireproof floor safe installed in say the walk-in closet of the master suite that could then be hidden under the carpet.
Would need to have someone come out and install it and I have no idea what that would cost.
But I expect that burying a safe into the concrete slab foundation would make it pretty fireproof and theft proof.
With a really top quality safe set in the floor I'm wondering then if I'd ever need a safety deposit box.
I tend to like the safety deposit idea better.
Whenever someone breaks into a house and they see a safe, it will immediate be the primary target since the burgler will assume that it contains something valuable.
They'll try to crow bar it, steal the whole safe, etc.
If you use a safety deposit box, your stuff will be in a sea of other valuables.
Robbing a bank is more difficult than robbing a house.
Paul I have the same kind of safe at home, about four years old.
It recently stopped opening and I had to call a locksmith.
The locksmith advised that all safes in that price range will fail within a few years.
We have kept using the home safe, for now, but are less sanguine about its viability as a long-term option.
We keep the most irreplaceable items in the bank safe deposit box original birth certificates, wills, cookie recipesand use the home safe for things that are either less valuable or that we need access to more frequently emergency cash, jewelry.
I have always assumed that banks let executors gain access to safe deposit boxes even in the absence of a key.
It is safety deposit box vs safe confirming with the bank.
Losing the key isn't the end of the world.
Bank safe deposit boxes are drilled open all the time, either by the owner or the personal representative of his estate.
IMO, the modest fee for a bank box is well worth the price and far more secure than a home safe.
Many banks give them out for free as does mine with a certain account relationship.
Bruce Cost basis is redundant.
One has a basis in an investment One advises and gives advice One should follow the principle of investing one's principal paulsiu wrote:.
Been there; had that done to me.
They didn't care that pushing it down the stairs would take out a few of the steps.
They didn't care that tipping it end over end would ruin my hardwood floor.
They were damned inconsiderate!
May neither drought nor rain nor blizzard disturb the joy juice in your gizzard.
Afterward, the bank was closed for about a week.
The folks with safety deposit boxes located on the bottom few rows luckily, I have a highly positioned box probably had damage to the contents of their boxes.
As an extra precaution, I had enclosed all my box contents in plastic bags, although I never imagined a flood would be a possibility.
My box was high and dry.
I keep auto pink slips, passports, rarely used checkbooks and extra credit cards in the box.
In the state of PA, if you pass away no one will have access to the box.
However, if the executor of the estate can provide a death certificate, the bank will give the executor access to the box.
This isn't as easy as showing up at the bank, but that does mean your heirs won't be locked out forever.
In addition, I have been told that the bank can also do a will search if your heirs have the keysbut generally it is not a good idea to store the will in a safety deposit box that essentially gets locked if you pass away.
Laws may be different from state to state.
Paul paulsiu wrote:In the state of PA, if you pass away no one will have access to the box.
However, if the executor of the estate can provide a death certificate, the bank will give the executor access to the box.
This isn't as easy as showing up at the bank, but that does mean your heirs won't be locked out forever.
In addition, I have been told that the bank can also do a will search if your heirs have the keysbut generally it is not a good idea to store the will in a safety deposit box that essentially gets locked if you pass away.
Laws may be different from state to state.
Paul I'm in PA.
You are correct, except if there is a surviving spouse.
When Dad died, the friendly bank manager strongly suggested to Mom that she clear out and close the safe deposit box since if she died, the bank would have to comply with state law and seal the box and inventory the contents for tax purposes.
Mom closed the box.
We keep tax records, paper checks, bonds, cash, some diamond jewelry and silver coins inside.
I work from home and we have a big barky dog and a strong Second Amendment philosophy when it comes to protecting what's ours.
And we have a nice castle doctrine law in our state.
I purchased a home closet safe about a year ago.
Here are some things to consider: Safes are rated for three different kinds of peril: Burglary, Fire, and Water.
Each category has a different rating system.
Most of the "safes" sold for use in the home are classified by Underwriter's Laboratory UL as "Residential Security Containers" RSC not "safes".
Many, but not all of the safes on the market are approved as Residential Security Containers.
Look for the UL label on the safe to see if source you're considering is UL approved as opinion boxing bonanza game free download join RSC.
A RSC is not as burglar-proof as a true safe with a UL "tool" TL rating.
A high-end safe might have a TL-30 rating for example.
This means that it will protect the contents of the safe from a motivated thief with appropriate tools for 30 minutes.
The vast majority of home safes will not have a UL or Intertek fire rating.
Home safe manufacturers like to point to the RSC approval label and say it "pass UL testing".
This is a lie.
It only means it passed UL testing as a RSC.
It says NOTHING about the fire rating.
Most manufacturers "self certify" their safes for fire.
For example, a typical safe may have a "rating" of 60 minutes, at 1200 deg F.
This means that it will supposedly keep the interior below 350 deg F when exposed to a 1200 deg F fire for 60 minutes.
I haven't done any testing on my own, but as an engineer and a certified skeptic, I think most of the home safe manufacturers are playing games with this testing.
For example, they may lay the safe down on it's back during testing or place a container of water inside during testing.
UL doesn't allow these cheats.
If you see a safe with a UL rating for fire, you can be relatively certain it was properly tested.
If you don't see a UL or ETL Intertek label showing the fire rating, you can assume the manufacturer exaggerated the claim.
Water ratings are rather rare.
A few of the lightweight Sentry safes are rated for water, but not many others.
I ended up getting a Liberty Premium 20 safemostly because it was the only one I could find that would fit in the upstairs closet.
I believe the 60 minute, 1200 deg F fire rating is optimistic as there are large holes in the sheetrock insulation for the hidden hinges.
I have it screwed to the floor and it weighs 630 lbs so it would take a determined thief to get it open, but I'm certain it could be done in less than 30 minutes with an angle grinder and diamond blade.
In my judgement I believe this design to be more reliable than other electronic locks that use a motor to actuate the lock mechanism.
I bought a lifetime warranty on the lock just in case.
I was rather put-off by the fact that the label in the Liberty Premium 20 didn't agree with the manufacturer's datasheet in some areas like the gauge of the sheet-metal body and by the large holes in the insulation to accommodate the hidden hinges so I bought a Champion SS-12 for my sweetie for Christmas 2011.
It is smaller and lighter than the Liberty Premium 20.
In my experience virtually ALL of the home safe manufacturers are a bit sketchy.
The label on my Liberty shows 11 gauge sheet-metal for the body, but I measured it and it's 12 thinner.
The literature for the Champion including their website shows internal hinges, but the safe that showed up has external hinges.
I bought lifetime warranties on both of the electronic locks but had trouble getting documentation from the manufacturer that I had the warranty.
They kept saying it was "on file".
click here good enough for me.
It would be easy to "accidentally" lose any record of my warranty when it came time to pay a claim.
Costco often has sales on decent home safes.
The Bighorn series appear to be better than the Cannon series, but YMMV.
That is a very good value.
In my area, the safe dealers advertise on Craigslist.
They seem to be sold by "moonlighters" that have large acreages in outlying areas where they can put large barns for their showrooms.
The Sentry safes that are sold just about everywhere are very flimsy.
I could open one with a crowbar in 5 minutes.
You'd be better off with the Costco Bighorn 19ECB than a Sentry in my view.
I also have a safe deposit box that contains things I really don't want stolen, like my Grandfather's pocket watch.
A few things: I safe that isn't bolted to the floor with strong screws is just a nice box that will help the thieves carry everything out in one big load.
Also, you really can't rely on a safe to store magnetic media, like floppy-disks, hard-drives, etc.
Remember that the fire rating of a safe is specified to keep the interior of the safe below 350 deg F.
This is because paper will begin to yellow at 350 deg F.
Magnetic media will be toast at MUCH lower temperatures.
If you're concerned about keeping your digital data safe from fire, invest in an offsite backup service.
My brother backs his data up to my computer and I backup to his using CrashPlan.
Safes will not protect magnetic media.
Having both a safety deposit box and a floor safe may not be a bad idea.
Also, with a home safe, I prefer a good floor safe.
It is hidden and out of site.
It also will protect much better against fire and tornadoes, being cemented into the floor.
Best to tell as few as possible about having a safe at home.
Here is a place I have done business with.
The website may be helpful: hazlitt777 wrote:Having both a safety deposit box and a floor safe may not be a bad idea.
Also, with a home safe, I prefer a good floor safe.
It is hidden and out of site.
It also will protect much better against fire and tornadoes, being cemented into the floor.
Best to tell as few as possible about having a safe at home.
Here is a place I have done business with.
The website may be helpful: A floor safe will be of limited value if you live in a flood zone.
Oh sure, the contents will be safe from robbery unless someone b and e'ing with scuba gear and underworth acetylene torch.
Grt2bOutdoors wrote:Here is a place I have done business with.
The website may be helpful: Did you mean to link to a blatantly political rant by Ron Paul in violation of the forum rules?
We have a safety deposit box to keep some important paper documents and passports.
We think is well worth 100 bucks a year.
But never thought about putting them in a plastic bag for water protection.
Will probably go there this weekend to do that.
I've done some more online research into Safes and have found this additional information.
Although it seems illogical to me, it appears that there are few if any floor safes that are fireproof.
I fail to understand the logic to this frankly.
In any fire, heat rises due to convection and if we are talking about a cement slab foundation there is nothing below the floor level to combust.
So a safe buried within a concrete foundation would seem to be the best place to find fire protection.
However most if not all of the fireproof safes on the market seem either to be stand-alone safes or wall safes.
Why one would want to put a fireproof safe into a wooden wall that will combust as opposed to a concrete foundation that will not is beyond me but perhaps there is something about house fires that I do not understand.
I'm not really worried about flood protection.
My subdivision is on the highest point in my county and I'm at a pretty high point in the subdivision so it is basically downhill in every direction.
The local river would have to rise by over 250 ft for our house to flood.
Nevertheless, using sealed dry bags or zip lock bags for important documents does seem prudent.
The best bargains for safes seem to be the big gun safes like those currently on sale at Costco.
I'm not really looking to store guns or valuables, mainly just to use the safe as good place to store documents and materials that we don't want to lose or misplace photo albums, etc.
The one disadvantage to putting in a big gun safe is that it becomes on obvious here for thieves who will think it contains all the good stuff.
If I'm gone on vacation for a week or two which we occasionally do I hate to think that some thieves would be coming back with hammers, drills, and what not to destroy the safe thinking it is full of guns and gold or some such.
That's why I was originally thinking that a hidden floor safe would make the most sense, especially as there are no guns safety deposit box vs safe />About 5 years ago when we lived in a different subdivision we had a real scare when a big grass fire nearly took out our neighborhood.
It was stopped by the highway but had it jumped the road our 50 house subdivision would have been ashes.
Since then and after seeing Katrina I have kept a "go folder" of all of our important documents so that if we ever had to evacuate I would have one single accordian folder to grab that has everything we would need for temporary relocation.
Perhaps it should all be in a safety deposit box but in a major disaster that might be difficult to get into as well.
Plus, my wife is nervous about storing passports in a bank as she has most of her family in Chile and feels the need to be able to fly down on a moment's notice if necessary if something happened to her mom or something.
She wouldn't want to wait until Monday for the bank to open, especially on a holiday weekend.
I guess I should probably go talk to a local locksmith and safe dealer and see what they recommend.
The best bargains for safes seem queen of the wild free slots be the big gun safes like those currently on sale at Costco.
I'm not really looking to store guns or valuables, mainly just to use the safe as good place to store documents and materials that we don't want to lose or misplace photo albums, etc.
The one disadvantage to putting in a big gun safe is that it becomes on obvious target for thieves who will think it contains all the good stuff.
If I'm gone on vacation for a week or two which we occasionally do I hate to think that some thieves would be coming back with hammers, drills, and what not to destroy the safe thinking it is full of guns and gold or some such.
That's why I was originally thinking that a hidden floor safe would make the most sense, especially as there are no guns involved.
What some people seem to do is keep two safes -- one is relatively easy to find, medium-to-low quality, more info contains decoy valuables.
The other is well hidden, higher quality, and has your real valuables.
That's too much for me, but might be appropriate for you.
Grt2bOutdoors wrote:Here is a place I have done business with.
The website may be helpful: Did you mean to link to a blatantly political rant by Ron Paul in violation of the forum rules?
I apologize about that.
I don't know how I did that other than posting that link on facebook and accidently posting it here.
I corrected my original post.
Here also is the correct link: I discontinued my safe deposit box years ago.
I found it inconvenient and costly.
I went with a basic 2' x 2' home safe which is anchored to the concrete slab in an inconspicuous corner of the garage with a cardboard box covering it.
It is mostly for fire protection but unless a thief is planning to spend some time rummaging through every box in the house and then spending time going through the garage chances are he won't find it.
If he does then he has to figure a way of removing it from the slab or just breaking in to it right there.
For all that effort he'll get a few car titles, a marriage license, and a couple of other non-valuable, non-negotiable odds and ends.
The best bargains for safes seem to be the big gun safes like those currently on sale at Costco.
I'm not really looking to store guns or valuables, mainly just to use the safe as good place to store documents and materials that we don't want to lose or misplace photo albums, etc.
The one disadvantage to putting in a big gun safe is that it becomes on obvious target for thieves who will think it contains all the good stuff.
If I'm gone on vacation for a week or two which we occasionally do I hate to think that some thieves would be coming back with hammers, drills, and what not to destroy the safe thinking it is full of guns and gold or some such.
That's why I was originally thinking that a hidden floor safe would make the most sense, especially as there are no guns involved.
What some people seem to do is keep two safes -- one is relatively easy to find, medium-to-low quality, and contains decoy valuables.
The other is well hidden, higher quality, and has your real valuables.
That's too much for me, but might be appropriate for you.
Therefore when capable, feign incapacity; when active, inactivity.
When near, make it appear that you are far away; when far away, that you are near.
Offer the enemy a bait to lure him; feign disorder and strike him.
The website may be helpful: Did you mean to link to a blatantly political rant by Ron Paul in violation of the forum rules?
Did you mean to blatantly link my username with that of another member.
One should be mindful of their own actions before pointing fingers.
In other words, don't be so quick to hit the submit button.
Aptenodytes wrote: What some people seem to do is keep two safes -- one is relatively easy to find, medium-to-low quality, and contains decoy valuables.
The other is well hidden, higher quality, and has your real valuables.
That's too much for me, but might be appropriate for you.
Similar to carrying a decoy wallet with a few one dollar bills and library cards in it to hand over to the thief.
The best bargains for safes seem to be the big gun safes like those currently on sale at Costco.
I'm not really looking to store guns or valuables, mainly just to use the safe as good place to store documents and materials that we don't want to lose or misplace photo albums, etc.
The one disadvantage to putting in a big gun safe is that it becomes on obvious target for thieves who will think it contains all the good stuff.
If I'm gone on vacation for a week or two which we occasionally do I hate to think that some thieves would be coming back with hammers, drills, and what not to destroy the safe thinking it is full of guns and gold or some such.
That's why I was originally thinking that a hidden floor safe would make the most sense, especially as there are no guns involved.
What some people seem to do is keep two safes -- one is relatively easy to find, medium-to-low quality, and contains decoy valuables.
The other is well hidden, higher quality, and has your real valuables.
That's too much for me, but might be appropriate for you.
Well, I already have the cheap safe.
I could leave it sitting around as bait with nothing in it but rocks if I installed something higher quality and hidden.
Or better yet, some of those explosive dye packets if they can be purchased some place and put in a safe to go off if the door is opened or the safe is cut open.
I could leave it sitting around as bait with nothing in it but rocks if I installed something higher quality and hidden.
Or better yet, some of those explosive dye packets if they can be purchased some place and put in a safe to go off if the door is opened or the safe is cut open.
From what I've read the recommended strategy is to let the thieves think they've stolen something of value to you, to prevent them carrying out revenge vandalism or damaging searches for the real safe.
They might bust open the safe on site rather than haul it away.
I could leave it sitting around as bait with nothing in it but rocks if I installed something higher quality and hidden.
Or better yet, some of those explosive dye packets if they can be purchased some place and put in a safe to go off if the door is opened or the safe is cut open.
From what I've read the recommended strategy is to let the thieves think they've stolen something of value to you, to more info them carrying out revenge vandalism or damaging searches for the real safe.
They might bust open the safe on site rather than haul it away.
So what would you suggest to leave the thieves as something of value?
I'm thinking fake diamonds or gold?
I could leave it sitting around as bait with nothing in it but rocks if I installed something higher quality and hidden.
Or better yet, some of those explosive dye packets if they can be purchased some place and put in a safe to go off if the door is opened or the safe is cut open.
From what I've read the recommended strategy is to let the thieves think they've stolen something of value to you, to prevent them carrying out revenge vandalism or damaging searches for the real safe.
They might bust open the safe on site rather than haul it away.
So what would you suggest to leave the thieves as something of value?
I'm thinking fake diamonds or gold?
Some cash you can afford to lose - remember, this is not likely to be lost but you want it to be convincing if you're actually storing things of value in your other safe.
Or if you are forced to open it under duress.
A piece of jewelry or two nothing irreplacable.
Small safes in walls or small stand up safes melt in big fires.
Even big gun safes that go in the garage melt in big fires.
I know from our friends who lost everything in a big forest fire that home safes are almost worthless.
That is why insurance companies make you give them itemized lists for jewelry and then take out special insurance.
My friends could not even find the remains of their safe.
It was a small floor model.
Same for another guy who lost his gun safe.
It melted into a big pile of twisted metal.
In this fire even forged metal tools were bent and twisted so fires get HOT.
So convert any pictures you have to digital media format and store the media and all wills and life insurance policies and birth certificates and other special documents and so forth in a bank safety deposit box.
Then make plan to keep one key off site far away from your home at your kids house or a friends house or some such special place.
Good Luck Bill This thread made me smile.
The Costco coupons showed up and I said to my wife that we could get a safe to replace the bank deposit box.
She said no way.
We have a lot of silver and gold in it, plus an external hard drive that contains a copy of my music collection which is 392 GBs 57,000+ songs and a lot of financial info and documents.
I don't have a home safe.
I do have a safety deposit box or two where I keep diamonds and pearls.
Paradons Prince user5027 wrote:I wonder where that goes on the PA Estate Tax form.
Vehicles purchased from Jan, 2012 thru March, 2013 have the option to stay with the old system or the go into the new system.
Beginning April 1st the lump sum is mandatory.
The optionality is killing me.
Back to home safes and deposit boxes.
It also takes some muscle to lift the XL deposit boxes up to and out of a high slot if a lot of metal items are contained therein.
My wife couldn't lift it.
I had to add to the levity in this thread Don't forget to cement it in so it can't be stolen from your safety deposit box.
Home safe or bank safe deposit box?
You need answer only one question.
If a criminal awakened you at night and ordered you to open your home safe, would you?
The correct answer is "yes," and the logical conclusion, therefore, is " get a bank safe deposit box.
You need answer only one question.
If a criminal awakened you at night and ordered you to open your home safe, would you?
The correct answer is "yes," and the logical conclusion, therefore, is " get a bank safe deposit box.
I'd put it in the bank.
Rubiosa wrote:Home safe or bank safe deposit box?
You need answer only one question.
If a criminal awakened you at night and ordered you to open your home safe, would you?
The correct answer is "yes," and the logical conclusion, therefore, is " get a bank safe deposit box.
Aptenodytes wrote:I have the same kind of safe at home, about four years old.
It recently stopped opening and I had to call a locksmith.
The locksmith advised that all safes in that price range will fail within a few years.
We have kept using the home safe, for now, but are less sanguine about its viability as a long-term option.
Did you buy a new home safe, or are you still using the one the locksmith had to come over to open?
In response to OP, I have a home safe bolted to the floor.
The box came in handy when I renovated my place several years ago.
Once the renovation was completed I went to the bank and emptied the box of all the jewelry, etc.
I had stored for safekeeping.
Everything now resides in my home safe.
In addition to jewelry the home safe holds cash, checkbooks, passports and similar stuff I don't want to get into the wrong hands.
I still keep the now empty bank box.
It doesn't cost me anything and I'm reluctant to give it up since I think they can be kind of hard to come by.
I use the home safe mainly to keep all my important stuff in one place that is secure enough.
The profile of a thief I am most concerned about would be someone with access to my place like a maintenance worker, service person, etc.
But I have been concerned about the safe malfunctioning, thereby creating a big hassle to recover its contents, especially one day when I am pressed for time because I have to grab my passport for an international flight.
Hence, Aptenodytes' comment is starting to make me worry!
I currently have both but I'm always worried about losing the little safety deposit box key or how my heirs would get into the box.
More for fire protection than theft I guess as thieves could use a hand cart to just walk out with it.
My specific questions are the following: 1.
If you have a home safe, what type is it?
What documents do you put in your home safe vs your safety deposit box?
I am thinking about looking into getting a much better safe installed at the house.
Not for valuables so much as documents and things I just don't want to ever lose.
This is Texas and we have concrete slab foundations.
So the best solution would seem to be to have a higher end fireproof floor safe installed in say the walk-in closet of the master suite that could then be hidden under the carpet.
Would need to have someone come out and install it and I have no idea what that would cost.
But I expect that burying a safe into the concrete slab foundation would make it pretty fireproof and theft proof.
With a really top quality safe set in the floor I'm wondering then if I'd ever need a safety deposit box.
Texasdiver, I think it really depends on what you want to put inside.
If your safety deposit box is in the bank you can only access it during bank hours.
A safe that is in your house is something you can access anytime but it is not as secure as a lockbox in the bank.
For everyday use, I would want a home safe.
I was in a similar position as you, I was deciding between a safety deposit box or a home safe.
I did research to see what would be a better fit for me.
I stumbled upon a post that does a fantastic job.
I would read it if you have not made up your mind on which one to select.
I don't like to hold my cash in there, I like spending it.
I personally decided on a safe.
One thing to consider; it shouldn't be out in the open for everyone to see.
Good luck on making your decision.
If I wanted a private bankvault I suppose I could buy one and put it somewhere, but I'm not sure the police response would be as robust.
I can survive without access to anything in there for some time, should the branch be closed.
It might be inconvenient, but it won't be life-changing.
I should think the chances of the branch being inaccessible are lower than the chances of my home being inaccessible.
Given that I do need a small secure and off-site storage space, a safe deposit box makes sense and is worth the rent, plus the small one-time investment in large heavy-duty ziploc bags to defend against water that's suppressing a fireto me.
Others' circumstances and judgements may be different.
PJW As a private banking client I get a small SDB for free and I put a handful of valuables in there but honestly I don't find a ton of use for it as I have a large gun safe at home I'm in PA.
You are correct, except if there is a surviving spouse.
When Dad died, the friendly bank manager strongly suggested to Mom that she clear out and close the safe deposit box since if she died, the bank would have to comply with state law and seal the box and inventory the contents for tax purposes.
In Pa, apparently opening a safe deposit box after death also requires that a member of the bar be present.
Pa has a rather broad-based inheritance tax.
Spouses can inherit with no tax, but descendants and parents pay 4.
In Coloado, my father had the bank add me to his safe deposit box signature card.
After he passed away, there was no problem for me to access the box.
Also, I recall about 35 years ago, some people broke into a grocery store in the city where I lived and they tried to get access to a small floor safe embedded in the concrete floor by using a torch acetylene I think.
They gave up, however the next day when the owner opened the safe, the cash that had been in the safe was burned up and not recoverable.
Wealth can vanish in the wink of an eye.
It can seem to grow wings and fly away like an eagle.
Would the concrete crush the safe and possibly cause it to open up somewhat to be damaged by the heat?
Just an honest thought, I have no idea.
Also, it would seem that this safe would be susceptible to water in a fire and possibly get flooded.
I've toyed with the idea of surrounding a safe with bricks to improve the fire protection.
I wonder what difference a hundred or so bricks surrounding a safe or security container, whatever you have would make.
BertB wrote:Last year the bank where I have a safety deposit box was flooded in a 100 source storm.
Afterward, the bank was closed for about a week.
The folks with safety deposit boxes located on the bottom few rows luckily, I have a highly positioned box probably had damage to the contents of their boxes.
As an extra precaution, I had enclosed all my box contents in plastic bags, although I never imagined a flood would be a possibility.
My box was high and dry.
I keep auto pink slips, passports, rarely used checkbooks and extra credit cards in the box.
My bank experienced a sprinkler failure last year over a 3-day weekend.
The vault was flooded in a similar manner.
Fortunately my box is at waist level and was unharmed, but they didn't tell me that on the phone when they called to let me know there "may" be an issue with my box.
When I was checking the box after the phone call, there was a locksmith there drilling out locks on many of the boxes.
The owners had lost the keys according to the bank employee.
Stephen The home safe is great for records and small amounts of cash, whereas all valuables and important documents should be kept in a safe deposit box.
If it's an option, I prefer to install them in the walls in the backs of closets or behind large pieces of furniture.
Your average criminal is of the smash and grab variety, and they're much more likely to try carrying out a huge safe they can see than to go tediously looking for a smaller one that they can't.
If it's an option, I prefer to install them in the walls in the backs of closets or behind large pieces of furniture.
Your average criminal is of the smash and grab variety, and they're much more likely to try carrying out a huge safe they can see than to go tediously looking for a smaller one that they can't.
Based on my own fairly cursory research on safe-related web sites it seems to me that the safes designed for concealment such as well safes and floor safes tend to be less fireproof than the stand along safes designed to withstand fires.
So basically the choice free frozen boxes game online do you want a hidden safe or a really fireproof safe.
I expect at the really high end you can get both but not so much at the prices I was looking at.
I think best spot to put a safe might be to install a floor safe in the garage, cover it with a floor mat and park a car over it that you don't drive much.
I've also seen recommended to put your safe in the garage or an odd closet and inside a big cardboard box labeled "winter clothes" or college books or some such.
And probably not the master bedroom closet but some spare bedroom.
Just how safe are bank safe deposit boxes?
I use one and a lot of bank employees see my take stuff in and out.
How safe are bank safety deposit boxes?
read more opening a safe deposit box at our local bank this weekend.
In it will go the wills, advance directives, power of attorneys, deeds, titles, birth certificates, passports, life insurance policies, instructions as to how my wife should proceed with her finances after I die, and an external hard drive containing backups of all important documents and family photos.
Everything is double-sealed in waterproof bags.
Can't be too careful.
BertB wrote:Last year the bank where I have a safety deposit box was flooded in a 100 year storm.
Afterward, the bank was closed for about a week.
The folks with safety deposit boxes located on the bottom few rows luckily, I have a highly positioned box probably had damage to the contents of their boxes.
As an extra precaution, I had enclosed all my box contents in plastic bags, although I never imagined a flood would be a possibility.
My box was high and dry.
My credit union advised me to put papers in a plastic bag when I opened a box, as they said that the box isn't protected from floods.
The building is not in a floodplain, but boxes can get wet from other things such as burst pipes.
No guarantees are made as to the accuracy of the information on queen of the wild free slots site or the appropriateness of any advice to your particular situation.
Powered by ยฎ Forum Software ยฉ phpBB Limited Time: 0.

B6655644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 200

Storing emergency cash in a safe deposit box is also unwise, advisers say. Unlike money in a deposit account, cash in a safe deposit box isnโ€™t insured by the F.D.I.C., and it may be vulnerable.


Enjoy!
Home Safe vs Safety Deposit Box - new-fit.ru
Valid for casinos
3 Things You Should Never Put in Your Safe-Deposit Box โ€” and 6 Things You Should | SafeBee
Visits
Dislikes
Comments

JK644W564
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
60 xB
Max cash out:
$ 500

An heirloom ring can easily fit into a safety deposit box, but we all know that valuables come in all shapes and sizes. When it comes to a pure price vs space comparison, safety deposit boxes are only cost effective for small spaces before they are overtaken by other storage solutions.


Enjoy!
Home Safe vs Safety Deposit Box - new-fit.ru
Valid for casinos
3 Things You Should Never Put in Your Safe-Deposit Box โ€” and 6 Things You Should | SafeBee
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities I'm curious what other bogleheads think about home safes vs safety deposit boxes.
I currently have both but I'm always worried about losing the little safety deposit box key or how my heirs would get into the box.
More for fire protection than theft I guess as thieves could use a hand cart to just walk out with it.
My specific questions are the following: 1.
If you have a home safe, what type is it?
What documents do you put in your home safe vs your safety deposit box?
I am thinking about looking into getting a much better safe installed at the house.
Not for valuables so much as documents and things I just don't want to ever lose.
This is Texas and we have concrete slab foundations.
So the best solution would seem to be to have a higher end fireproof floor safe installed in say the walk-in closet of the master suite that could then be hidden under the carpet.
Would need to have someone come out and install it and I have no idea what that would cost.
But I expect that burying a safe into the concrete slab foundation would make it pretty fireproof and theft proof.
With a really top quality safe set in the floor I'm wondering then if I'd ever need a safety deposit box.
I tend to like the safety deposit idea better.
Whenever someone breaks into a house and they see a safe, it will immediate be the primary target since the burgler will assume that it contains something valuable.
They'll try to crow bar it, steal https://new-fit.ru/box/caesars-windsor-casino-box-office.html whole safe, etc.
If you use a safety deposit box, your stuff will be in a sea of other valuables.
Robbing a bank is more difficult than robbing a house.
Paul I have the same kind of safe at home, about four years old.
It recently stopped opening and I had to call a locksmith.
The locksmith advised that all safes in that price range will fail within a few years.
We have kept using the home safe, for now, but are less sanguine about its viability as a long-term option.
We keep the most irreplaceable items in the bank safe deposit box original birth certificates, wills, cookie recipesand use the home safe for things that are either less valuable or that we need access to more frequently emergency cash, jewelry.
I have always assumed that banks let executors gain access to safe deposit boxes even in the absence of a key.
It is worth confirming with the bank.
Losing the key isn't the end of the world.
Bank safe deposit boxes are drilled open all the time, either by the owner or the personal representative of his estate.
IMO, the modest fee for a bank box is well worth the price and far more secure than a home safe.
Many banks give them out for free as does mine with a certain account relationship.
Bruce Cost basis is redundant.
One has a basis in an investment One advises and gives advice One should follow the principle of investing one's principal paulsiu wrote:.
Been there; had that done to me.
They didn't care that pushing it down the stairs would take out a few of the steps.
They didn't care that tipping it end over end would ruin my hardwood floor.
They were damned inconsiderate!
May neither drought nor rain nor blizzard disturb the joy juice in your gizzard.
Afterward, the bank was closed for about a week.
The folks with safety deposit boxes located on the bottom few rows luckily, I have a highly positioned box probably had damage to the contents of their boxes.
As an extra precaution, I had enclosed all my box contents in plastic bags, although I never imagined a flood would be a possibility.
My box was high and dry.
I keep auto pink slips, passports, rarely used checkbooks and extra credit cards in the box.
In the state of PA, if you pass away no one will have access to the box.
However, if the executor of the estate can provide a death certificate, the bank will give the executor access to the box.
This isn't as easy as showing up at the bank, but that does mean your heirs won't be locked out forever.
In addition, I have been told that the bank can also do a will search if your heirs have the keysbut generally it is not a good idea to store the will in a safety deposit box that essentially gets locked if you pass away.
Laws may be different from state to state.
Paul paulsiu wrote:In the state of PA, if you pass away no one will have access to the box.
However, if the executor of the estate can provide a death certificate, the bank will give the executor access to the box.
This isn't as easy as showing up at the bank, but that does mean your heirs won't be locked out forever.
In addition, I have been told that the bank can also do a will search if your heirs have the keysbut generally it is not a good idea to store the will in a safety deposit box that essentially gets locked if you pass away.
Laws may be different from state to state.
Paul I'm in PA.
You are correct, except if there is a surviving spouse.
When Dad died, the friendly bank manager strongly suggested to Mom that she clear out and close the safe deposit box link if she died, the bank would have to comply with state law and seal the box and inventory the contents for tax purposes.
Mom closed the box.
We keep tax records, paper checks, bonds, cash, some diamond jewelry and silver coins inside.
I work from home and we have a big barky dog and a strong Second Amendment philosophy when it comes to protecting what's ours.
And we have a nice castle doctrine law in our state.
I purchased a home closet safe about a year ago.
Here are some things to consider: Safes are rated games desktop download free box toy three different kinds of peril: Burglary, Fire, and Water.
Each category has a different rating system.
Most of the "safes" sold for use in the home are classified by Underwriter's Laboratory UL as "Residential Security Containers" RSC not "safes".
Many, but not all of the safes on the market are approved as Residential Security Containers.
Look for the UL label on the safe to see if one you're considering is UL approved as a RSC.
A RSC is not as burglar-proof as a true safe with a UL "tool" TL rating.
A high-end safe might have a TL-30 rating for example.
This means that it will protect the contents of the safe from a motivated thief with appropriate tools for 30 minutes.
The vast majority of home safes will not have a UL or Intertek fire rating.
Home safe manufacturers like to point to the RSC approval label and say it "pass UL testing".
This is a lie.
It only means it passed UL testing as a RSC.
It says NOTHING about the fire rating.
Most manufacturers "self certify" their safes for fire.
For example, a typical safe may have a "rating" of 60 live boxing streaming online free, at 1200 deg F.
This means that it will supposedly keep the interior below 350 deg F when exposed to a 1200 deg F fire for 60 minutes.
I haven't done any testing on my own, but as an engineer and a certified skeptic, I think most of the home safe manufacturers are playing games with this testing.
For example, they may lay the safe down on it's back during testing or place a container of water inside during testing.
UL doesn't allow these cheats.
If you see a safe with a UL rating for fire, you can be relatively certain it was properly tested.
If you don't queen of the wild free slots a UL or ETL Intertek label showing the fire rating, you can assume the manufacturer exaggerated the claim.
Water ratings are rather rare.
A few of the lightweight Sentry safes are rated for water, but not many others.
I ended up getting a Liberty Premium 20 safemostly because it was the only one I could find that would fit in the upstairs closet.
I believe the 60 minute, 1200 deg F fire rating is optimistic as there are large holes in the sheetrock insulation for the hidden hinges.
I have it screwed to the floor and it weighs 630 lbs so it would take a determined thief to get it open, but I'm certain it could be just click for source in less than 30 minutes with an angle grinder and diamond blade.
In my judgement I believe this design to be more reliable than other electronic locks that use a motor to actuate the lock mechanism.
I bought a lifetime warranty on the lock just in case.
I was rather put-off by the fact that the label in the Liberty Premium 20 didn't agree with the manufacturer's datasheet in some areas like the gauge of the sheet-metal body and by the large holes in the insulation to accommodate the hidden hinges so I bought a Champion SS-12 for my sweetie for Christmas 2011.
It is smaller and lighter than the Liberty Premium 20.
In my experience virtually ALL of the home safe manufacturers are a bit sketchy.
The label on my Liberty shows 11 gauge sheet-metal for the body, but I suggest cable box with cablecard slot you it and it's 12 thinner.
The literature for the Champion including their website shows internal hinges, but the safe that showed up has external hinges.
I bought lifetime warranties on both of the electronic locks but had trouble getting documentation from the manufacturer that I had the warranty.
They kept saying it was "on file".
Not good enough for me.
It would be easy to "accidentally" lose any record of my warranty when it came time to pay a claim.
Costco often has sales on decent home safes.
The Bighorn series appear to be better than the Cannon series, but YMMV.
That is a very good value.
In my area, the safe dealers advertise on Craigslist.
They seem to be sold by "moonlighters" that have large acreages in outlying areas where they can put large barns for their showrooms.
The Sentry safes that are sold just about everywhere are very flimsy.
I could open one with a crowbar in 5 minutes.
You'd be better off with the Here Bighorn 19ECB than a Sentry in my view.
I also have a safe deposit box that contains things I really don't want stolen, like my Grandfather's pocket watch.
A few things: I safe that isn't bolted to the floor with strong screws is just a nice box that will help the thieves carry everything out in one big load.
Also, you really can't rely on a safe to store magnetic media, like floppy-disks, hard-drives, etc.
Remember that the fire rating of a safe is specified to keep the interior of the safe below 350 deg F.
This is because paper will begin to yellow at 350 deg F.
Magnetic media will be toast at MUCH lower temperatures.
If you're concerned about keeping your digital data safe from fire, invest in an offsite backup service.
My brother backs his data up to my computer and I backup to his using CrashPlan.
Safes will not protect magnetic media.
Having both a safety deposit box and a floor safe may not be a bad idea.
Also, with a home safe, I prefer a good floor safe.
It is hidden and out of site.
It also will protect much better against fire and tornadoes, being cemented into the floor.
Best to tell as few as possible about having a safe at home.
Here is a place I have done business with.
The website may be helpful: hazlitt777 wrote:Having both a safety deposit box and a floor safe may not be a bad idea.
Also, with a home safe, I prefer a good floor safe.
It is hidden and out of site.
It also will protect much better against fire and tornadoes, being cemented into the floor.
Best to tell as few as possible about having a safe at home.
Here is a place I have done business with.
The website may be helpful: A floor safe will be of limited value if you safety deposit box vs safe in a flood zone.
Oh sure, the contents will be safe from robbery unless someone b and e'ing with scuba gear and underworth acetylene torch.
Grt2bOutdoors wrote:Here is a place I have done business with.
The website may be helpful: Did you mean to link to a blatantly political rant by Ron Paul in violation of the forum rules?
We have a safety deposit box to keep some important paper documents and passports.
We think is well worth 100 bucks a year.
But never thought about putting them in a plastic bag for water protection.
Will probably go there this weekend to do that.
I've done some more online research into Safes and have found this additional information.
Although it seems illogical to me, it appears that there are few if any floor safes that are fireproof.
I fail to understand the logic to this frankly.
In any fire, heat rises due to convection and if we are talking about a cement slab foundation there is nothing below the floor level to combust.
So a safe buried within a concrete foundation would seem to be the best place to find fire protection.
However most if not all of the fireproof safes on the market seem either to be stand-alone safes or wall safes.
Why one would want to put a fireproof safe into a wooden wall that will combust as opposed to a concrete foundation that will not is beyond me but perhaps there is something about house fires that I do not understand.
I'm not really worried about flood protection.
My subdivision is on the highest point in my county and I'm at a pretty high point in the subdivision so it is basically downhill in every direction.
The local river would have to rise by over 250 ft for our house to flood.
Nevertheless, using sealed dry bags or zip lock bags for important documents does seem prudent.
The best bargains for safes seem to be the big gun safes like those currently on sale at Costco.
I'm not really looking to store guns or valuables, mainly just to use the safe as good place to store documents and materials that we don't want to lose or misplace photo albums, etc.
The one disadvantage to putting in a big gun safe is that it becomes on obvious target for thieves who will think it contains all the good stuff.
If I'm gone on vacation for a week or two which we occasionally do I hate to think that some thieves would be coming back with hammers, drills, and what not to destroy the safe thinking it is full of guns and gold or some such.
That's why I was originally thinking that a hidden floor safe would make the most sense, especially as there are no guns involved.
About 5 years ago when we lived in a different subdivision we had a real scare when a big grass fire nearly took out our neighborhood.
It was stopped by the highway but had it jumped the road our 50 house subdivision would have been ashes.
Since then and after seeing Katrina I have kept a "go folder" of all of our important documents so that if we ever had to evacuate I would have one single accordian folder to grab that has everything we would need for temporary relocation.
Perhaps it should all be in a safety deposit box but in a major disaster that might be difficult to get into as well.
Plus, my wife is nervous about storing passports in a bank as she has most of her family in Chile and feels the need to be able to fly down on a moment's notice if necessary if something happened to her mom or something.
She wouldn't want to wait until Monday for the bank to open, especially on a holiday weekend.
I guess I should probably go talk to a local locksmith and safe dealer and see what they recommend.
The best bargains for safes seem to be the big gun safes like those currently on sale at Costco.
I'm not really looking to store guns or valuables, mainly just to use the safe as good place to store documents and materials that we don't want to lose or misplace photo albums, etc.
The one disadvantage to putting in a big gun safe is that it becomes on obvious target for thieves who will think it contains all the good stuff.
If I'm gone on vacation for a week or two which we occasionally do I hate to think that some thieves would be coming back with hammers, drills, and what not to destroy the safe thinking it is full of guns and gold or some such.
That's why I was originally thinking that a hidden floor safe would make the most sense, especially as there are no guns involved.
What some people seem to do is keep two safes -- one is relatively easy to find, medium-to-low quality, and contains decoy valuables.
The other is well hidden, higher quality, and has your real valuables.
That's too much for me, but might be appropriate for you.
Grt2bOutdoors wrote:Here is a place I have done business with.
The website may be helpful: Did you mean to link to a blatantly political rant by Ron Paul in violation of the forum rules?
I apologize about that.
I don't know how I did that other than posting that link on facebook and accidently posting it here.
I corrected my original post.
Here also is the correct link: I discontinued my safe deposit box years ago.
I found it inconvenient and costly.
I went with a basic 2' x 2' home safe which is anchored to the concrete slab in an inconspicuous corner of the garage with a cardboard box covering it.
It is mostly for fire protection but unless a thief is planning to spend some time rummaging through every box in the house and then spending time going through the garage chances are he won't find it.
If he does then he has to figure a way of removing it from the slab or just breaking in to it right there.
For all that effort he'll get a few car titles, a marriage license, and a couple of other non-valuable, non-negotiable odds and ends.
The best bargains for safes seem to be the big gun safes like those currently on sale at Costco.
I'm not really looking to store guns or valuables, mainly just to use the safe as good place to store documents and materials that we don't want to lose or misplace photo albums, etc.
The one disadvantage to putting in a big gun safe is that it becomes on obvious target for thieves who will think it contains all the good stuff.
If I'm gone on vacation for a week or two which we occasionally do I hate to think that safety deposit box vs safe thieves would be coming back with hammers, drills, and what not to destroy the safe thinking it is full of guns and gold or some such.
That's why I was originally thinking that a hidden floor safe would make the most sense, especially as there are no guns involved.
What some people seem to do is keep two safes -- one is relatively easy to find, medium-to-low quality, and contains decoy valuables.
The other is well hidden, higher quality, and has your real valuables.
That's too much for me, but might be appropriate for you.
Therefore when capable, feign incapacity; when active, inactivity.
When near, make it appear that you are far away; when far away, that you are near.
Offer the enemy a bait to lure him; feign disorder and strike him.
The website may be helpful: Did you mean to link to a blatantly political rant by Ron Paul in violation of the forum rules?
Did you mean to blatantly link my username with that of another member.
One should be mindful of their own actions before pointing fingers.
In other words, don't be so quick to hit the submit button.
Aptenodytes wrote: What some people seem to do is keep two safes -- one is relatively easy to find, medium-to-low quality, and contains decoy valuables.
The other is well hidden, higher quality, and has your real valuables.
That's too much for me, but might be appropriate for you.
Similar to carrying a decoy wallet with a few one dollar bills and library cards in it to hand over to the thief.
The best bargains for safes seem to be the big gun safes like those currently on sale at Costco.
I'm not really looking to store guns or valuables, mainly just to use the safe as good place to store documents and materials that we don't want to lose or misplace photo albums, etc.
The one disadvantage to putting in a big gun safe is that it becomes on obvious target for thieves who will think it contains all the good stuff.
If I'm gone on vacation for a week or two which we occasionally do I hate to think that some thieves would be coming back with hammers, drills, and what not to destroy the safe thinking it is full of guns and gold or some such.
That's why I was originally thinking that a hidden floor safe would make the most sense, especially as there are no guns involved.
What some people seem to do is keep two safes -- one is relatively easy to find, medium-to-low quality, and contains decoy valuables.
The other is well hidden, higher quality, and has your real valuables.
That's too much for me, but might be appropriate for you.
Well, I already have the cheap safe.
I could leave it sitting around as bait with nothing in it but rocks safety deposit box vs safe I installed something higher quality and hidden.
Or better yet, some of those explosive dye packets if they can be purchased some place and put in a safe to go off if the door is opened or the safe is cut open.
I could leave it sitting around as bait with nothing in it but rocks if I installed something higher quality and hidden.
Or better yet, some of those explosive dye packets if they can be purchased some place and put in a safe to go off if the door is opened or the safe is cut open.
From what I've read the recommended strategy is to let the thieves think they've stolen something of value to you, to prevent them carrying out revenge vandalism or damaging searches for the real safe.
They might bust open the safe on site rather than haul it away.
I could leave it sitting around as bait with nothing in it but rocks if I installed something higher quality and hidden.
Or better yet, some of those explosive dye packets if they can be safety deposit box vs safe some place and put in a safe to go off if the door is opened or the safe is cut open.
From what I've read the recommended strategy is to let the thieves think they've stolen something of value to you, to prevent them carrying out revenge vandalism or damaging searches for the real safe.
They might bust open the safe on site rather than haul it away.
So what would you suggest to leave the thieves as something of value?
I'm thinking fake diamonds or gold?
I could leave it sitting around as bait with nothing in it but rocks if I installed something higher quality and hidden.
Or better yet, some of those explosive dye packets if they can be purchased some place and put in a safe to go off if the door is opened or the safe is cut open.
From what I've read the recommended strategy is to let the thieves think they've stolen something of value to you, to prevent them carrying out revenge vandalism or damaging searches for the real safe.
They might bust open the safe on site rather than haul it away.
So what would you suggest to leave the thieves as something of value?
I'm thinking fake diamonds or gold?
Some cash you can afford to lose - remember, this is not likely to be lost but you want it to be convincing if you're actually storing things of value in your other safe.
Or if you are forced to open it under duress.
A piece of jewelry or two nothing irreplacable.
Small safes in walls or small stand up safes melt in big fires.
Even big gun safes that go in the garage melt in big fires.
I know from our friends who lost everything in a big forest fire that home safes are almost worthless.
That is why insurance companies make you give them itemized lists for jewelry and then take out special insurance.
My friends could not even find the remains of their safe.
It was a small floor model.
Same for another guy who lost his gun safe.
It melted into a big pile of twisted metal.
In this fire even forged metal tools were bent and twisted so fires get HOT.
So convert any pictures you have to digital media format and store the media and all wills and life insurance policies and birth certificates and other special documents and so forth in a bank safety deposit box.
Then make plan to keep one key off site far away from your home at your kids house or a friends house or some such special place.
Good Luck Bill This thread made me smile.
The Costco coupons showed up and I said to my wife that we could get a safe to replace the bank deposit box.
She said no way.
We have a lot of silver and gold in it, plus an external hard drive that contains a copy of my music collection which is 392 GBs 57,000+ songs and a lot of financial info and documents.
I don't have a home safe.
I do have a safety deposit box or two where I keep diamonds and pearls.
Paradons Prince user5027 wrote:I wonder where that goes on the PA Estate Tax form.
Vehicles purchased from Jan, 2012 thru March, 2013 have the option to stay with the old system or the go into the new system.
Beginning April 1st the lump sum is mandatory.
The optionality is killing me.
Back to home safes and deposit boxes.
It also takes some muscle to lift the XL deposit boxes up to and out of a high slot if a lot of metal items are contained therein.
My wife couldn't lift it.
I had to add to the levity in this thread Don't forget to cement it in so it can't be stolen from your safety deposit box.
Home safe or bank safe deposit box?
You need answer only one question.
If a criminal awakened you at night and ordered you to open your home safe, would you?
The correct answer is "yes," and the logical conclusion, therefore, is " get a bank safe deposit box.
You need answer only one question.
If a criminal awakened you at night and ordered you to open your home safe, would you?
The correct answer is "yes," and the logical conclusion, therefore, is " get a bank safe deposit box.
I'd put it in the bank.
Rubiosa wrote:Home safe or bank safe deposit box?
You need answer only one question.
If a criminal awakened you at night and ordered you to open your home safe, would you?
The correct answer is "yes," and the logical conclusion, therefore, is " get a bank safe deposit box.
Aptenodytes wrote:I have the same kind of safe at home, about four years old.
It recently stopped opening and I had to call a locksmith.
The locksmith advised that all safes in that price range will fail within a few years.
We have kept using the home safe, for now, but are less sanguine about its viability as a long-term option.
Did you buy a new home safe, or are you still using the one the locksmith had to come over to open?
In response to OP, I have a home safe bolted to the floor.
The box came in handy when I renovated my place several years ago.
Once the renovation was completed I went to the bank and emptied the box check this out all the jewelry, etc.
I had stored for safekeeping.
Everything now resides in my home safe.
In addition to jewelry the home safe holds cash, checkbooks, passports and similar stuff I don't want to get into the wrong hands.
I still keep the now empty bank box.
It doesn't cost me anything and I'm reluctant to https://new-fit.ru/box/5-by-5-safe-deposit-box.html it up since I think they can be kind of hard to come by.
I use the home safe mainly to keep all my important stuff in one place that is secure enough.
The profile of a thief I am most concerned about would be someone with access to my place like a maintenance worker, service person, etc.
But I have been concerned about the safe malfunctioning, thereby creating a big hassle to recover its contents, especially one day when I am pressed for time because I have to grab my passport for an international flight.
Hence, Aptenodytes' comment is starting to make me worry!
I currently have both but I'm always worried about losing the little safety deposit box key or how my heirs would get into the box.
More for fire protection than theft I guess as thieves could use a hand cart to just walk out with it.
My specific questions are the following: 1.
If you have a home safe, what type is it?
What documents do you put in your home safe vs your safety deposit box?
I am thinking about looking into getting a much better safe installed at the house.
Not for valuables so much as documents and things I just don't want to ever lose.
This is Texas and we have concrete slab foundations.
So the best solution would seem to be to have a higher end fireproof floor safe installed in say the walk-in closet of the master suite that could then be hidden under the carpet.
Would need to have someone come out and install it and I have no idea what that would cost.
But I expect that burying a safe into the concrete slab foundation would make it pretty fireproof and theft proof.
With a really top quality safe set in the floor I'm wondering then if I'd ever need a safety deposit box.
Texasdiver, I think it really depends on what you want to put inside.
If your safety deposit box is in the bank you can only access it during bank hours.
A safe that is in your house is something you can access anytime but it is not as secure as a lockbox in the bank.
For everyday use, I would want a home safe.
I was in a similar position as you, I was deciding between a safety deposit box or a home safe.
I did research to see what would be a better fit for me.
I stumbled upon a post that does a fantastic job.
I would read it if you have not made up your mind on which one to select.
I don't like to hold my cash in there, I like spending it.
I personally decided on a safe.
One thing to consider; it shouldn't be out in the open for everyone to see.
Good luck on making your decision.
If I wanted a private bankvault I suppose I could buy one and put it somewhere, but I'm not sure the police response would be as robust.
I can survive without access to anything in there for some time, should the branch be closed.
It might be inconvenient, but it won't be life-changing.
I should think the chances of the branch being inaccessible are lower than the chances of my home being inaccessible.
Given that I do need a small secure and off-site storage space, a safe deposit box makes sense and is worth the rent, plus the small one-time investment in large heavy-duty ziploc bags to defend against water that's suppressing a fireto me.
Others' circumstances and judgements may be different.
PJW As a private banking client I get a small SDB for free and I put a handful of valuables in there but honestly I don't find a ton of use for it as I have a large gun safe at home I'm in PA.
You are correct, except if there is a surviving spouse.
When Dad died, the friendly bank manager strongly suggested to Mom that she clear out and close the safe deposit box since if she died, the bank would have to comply with state law and seal the box and inventory the contents for tax purposes.
In Pa, apparently opening a safe deposit box after death also requires that a member of the bar be present.
Pa has a rather broad-based inheritance tax.
Spouses can inherit with no tax, but descendants and parents pay 4.
In Coloado, my father had the bank add me to his safe deposit box signature card.
After he passed away, there was no problem for me to access the box.
Also, I recall about 35 years ago, some people broke into a grocery store in the city where I lived and they tried to get access to a small floor safe embedded in the concrete floor by using a torch acetylene I think.
They gave up, however the next day when the owner opened the safe, the cash that had been in the safe was burned up and not recoverable.
Wealth can vanish in the wink of an eye.
It can seem to grow wings and fly away like an eagle.
Would the concrete crush the safe and possibly cause it to open up somewhat to be damaged by the heat?
Just an honest thought, I have no idea.
Also, it would seem that this safe would be susceptible to water in a fire and possibly get flooded.
I've toyed with the idea of surrounding a safe with bricks to improve the fire protection.
I wonder what difference a hundred or so bricks surrounding a safe or security container, whatever you have would make.
BertB wrote:Last year the bank where I have a safety deposit box was flooded in a 100 year storm.
Afterward, the bank was closed for about a week.
The folks with safety deposit boxes located on the bottom few rows luckily, I have a highly positioned live streaming boxing pacquiao vs probably had damage to the contents of their boxes.
As an extra precaution, I had enclosed all my box contents in plastic bags, although I never imagined a flood would be a possibility.
My box was high and dry.
I keep auto pink slips, passports, rarely used checkbooks and extra credit cards in the box.
My bank experienced a sprinkler failure last year over a 3-day weekend.
The vault was flooded in a similar manner.
Fortunately my box is at waist level and was unharmed, but they didn't tell me that on the phone when they called to let me know there "may" be an issue with my box.
When I was checking the box after the phone call, there was a locksmith there drilling out locks on many of the boxes.
The owners had lost the keys according to the bank employee.
Stephen The home safe is great for records and small amounts of cash, whereas all valuables and important documents should be kept in a safe deposit box.
If it's an option, I prefer to install them in the walls in the backs of closets or behind large pieces of furniture.
Your average criminal is of the smash and grab variety, and they're much more likely to try carrying out a huge safe they can see than to go tediously looking for a smaller one that they can't.
If it's an option, I prefer to install them in the walls in the backs of closets or behind large pieces of furniture.
Your average criminal is of the smash and grab variety, and they're much more likely to try carrying out a huge safe they can see than to go tediously looking for a smaller one that they can't.
Based on my own fairly cursory research on safe-related web sites it seems to me that the safes designed for concealment such as well safes and floor safes tend to be less fireproof than the stand along safes designed to withstand fires.
So basically the choice is do you want a hidden safe or a really fireproof safe.
I expect at the really high end you can get both but not so much at the prices I was looking at.
I think best spot to put a safe might be to install a floor safe in the garage, dots online play game and boxes it with a floor mat and park a car over it that you don't drive much.
I've also seen recommended to put your safe in the garage or an odd closet and inside safety deposit box vs safe big cardboard box labeled "winter clothes" or college books or some such.
And probably not the master bedroom closet but some spare bedroom.
Just how safe are bank safe deposit boxes?
I use one and a lot of bank employees see my take stuff in and out.
How safe are bank safety deposit boxes?
We're opening a safe deposit box at our local bank this weekend.
In it will go the wills, advance directives, power of attorneys, deeds, titles, birth certificates, passports, life insurance policies, instructions as to how my wife should proceed with her finances after I die, and an external hard drive containing backups of all important documents and family photos.
Everything is double-sealed in waterproof bags.
Can't be too careful.
BertB wrote:Last year the bank where I have a safety deposit box was flooded in a 100 year storm.
Afterward, the bank was closed for about a week.
The folks with safety deposit boxes located on the bottom few rows luckily, I have a highly positioned box probably had damage to the contents of their boxes.
As an extra precaution, I had enclosed all my box contents in plastic bags, although I never imagined a flood would be a possibility.
My box was high and dry.
click the following article credit union advised me to put papers in a plastic bag when I opened a box, as they said that the box isn't protected from floods.
The building is not in a floodplain, but boxes can get wet from other things such as burst pipes.
No guarantees are made as to the accuracy of the information on this site or the appropriateness of any advice to your particular situation.
Powered by ยฎ Forum Software ยฉ phpBB Limited Time: 0.

B6655644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
50 xB
Max cash out:
$ 200

The Bank provides you with two keys when you open a new Safety Deposit Box contract....one way people get screwed is losing one of those keys, as the Bank will charge fees to replace the key when you close the Safety Deposit Box contract. Finally, with a Safety Deposit Box, you are limited to accessing your box during the opening hours of the.


Enjoy!
3 Things You Should Never Put in Your Safe-Deposit Box โ€” and 6 Things You Should | SafeBee
Valid for casinos
3 Things You Should Never Put in Your Safe-Deposit Box โ€” and 6 Things You Should | SafeBee
Visits
Dislikes
Comments

TT6335644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
50 xB
Max cash out:
$ 1000

Safety Deposit Boxes and Fireproof Safes โ€“ Store and Protect Valuables. Posted by Ryan Guina Last updated on April 22, 2019 | Home Ownership Advertiser Disclosure: Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the authorโ€™s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any other entity.


Enjoy!
Home Safe vs Safety Deposit Box - new-fit.ru
Valid for casinos
3 Things You Should Never Put in Your Safe-Deposit Box โ€” and 6 Things You Should | SafeBee
Visits
Dislikes
Comments

T7766547
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
60 xB
Max cash out:
$ 500

Safety Deposit Boxes and Fireproof Safes โ€“ Store and Protect Valuables. Posted by Ryan Guina Last updated on April 22, 2019 | Home Ownership Advertiser Disclosure: Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the authorโ€™s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any other entity.


Enjoy!
3 Things You Should Never Put in Your Safe-Deposit Box โ€” and 6 Things You Should | SafeBee
Valid for casinos
Home Safe vs Safety Deposit Box - new-fit.ru
Visits
Dislikes
Comments

B6655644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
50 xB
Max cash out:
$ 500

onelarger diebold safe deposit box tin. these boxes are new and never used. sturdy spot welded steel construction. this is the large size. this is for one box (1 each).


Enjoy!
3 Things You Should Never Put in Your Safe-Deposit Box โ€” and 6 Things You Should | SafeBee
Valid for casinos
12 things to keep in a safe at home, not at a bank - CBS News
Visits
Dislikes
Comments

G66YY644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
60 xB
Max cash out:
$ 1000

A safe-deposit box is typically a metal box located in a secured area at a bank, and can be leased from a bank. This box can usually be accessed during normal banking hours. Here's what to know.


Enjoy!
3 Things You Should Never Put in Your Safe-Deposit Box โ€” and 6 Things You Should | SafeBee
Valid for casinos
3 Things You Should Never Put in Your Safe-Deposit Box โ€” and 6 Things You Should | SafeBee
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
After all, banks have the best 24 hour security and alarm systems.
But the contents of a safe deposit box are rarely insured, while items in your home are typically covered by your homeowner's or renter's insurance policy.
Also, don't think safety deposit box vs safe this web page in a safe deposit box is covered under.
The FDIC only insures the deposits in accounts held in banks, but not the contents of their safe deposit boxes.
Bank safe deposit boxes are only accessible during branch operating hours and the boxes are typically sealed when the bank receives a death notice.
To open a sealed safe deposit box, estate representatives are required to provide to the bank.
For these reasons it's good idea to buy a in your home.
What should you keep in it?
Here are a dozen suggestions: 1.
Property insurance policies and agent contact information.
You'll need this information right away if your house suffers damage and you need to know how to file a claim.
Passports and original birth certificates.
These can be a hassle to replace and will come in handy to establish identity when traveling with online game jewel box />A list of family doctors, prescription medications, and contact information for all pharmacies you use.
You may need these to get new supplies of medications queen of the wild free slots use on a regular basis.
CDs or an external hard drive containing digital copies of all family photos.
It's a good idea to scan all older family photos and keep a digital copy of them as well.
Your family memories in photographs queen of the wild free slots irreplaceable.
Safe deposit box keys.
If you store valuables in a bank safe deposit box, you'll want to make sure you keep the keys to it in a safe place.
Important papers related to investments, retirement plans, bank accounts, and associated contact information.
You may also want to keep some cash on hand for safety deposit box vs safe access in an emergency.
Information on your outstanding debts, due dates, and contact information.
It's important to keep tabs on your finances and protect your credit, in the event you're displaced by a fire.
Original Social Safety deposit box vs safe cards.
These can take time to replace and may be needed to establish eligibility for benefits.
Copies of your important legal documents, including powers of attorney, living wills, and health care proxies -- both for yourself and for anyone safety deposit box vs safe for whom you are designated attorney-in-fact or health care surrogate.
Having queen of the wild free slots to these can help ensure the protection they were created to provide.
Copy of wills and all wills in which you are designated the executor.
It's important to have access to these as safe deposit boxes are typically sealed upon notification of the box owner's death.
Valuables: Jewelry, coins, safety deposit box vs safe, etc.
Spare Keys and titles to all vehicles.
It helps to know where copies are in the case that you need them.
Of course, exactly what you choose to store in your fireproof safe will depend on your personal circumstances and the size and location of the safe.
Ray Martin has been a practicing financial advisor since 1986, providing financial guidance and advice to individuals.
He has appeared regularly as a contributor on the CBS Early Show, CBS NewsPath, as a columnist on CBS Moneywatch.
He has also appeared on the Oprah Winfrey Show and is the author of two books.
Quotes delayed at least 15 minutes.
Market data provided by.
Powered and implemented by.
News provided by The Associated Press.

B6655644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 200

A safe-deposit box is typically a metal box located in a secured area at a bank, and can be leased from a bank. This box can usually be accessed during normal banking hours. Here's what to know.


Enjoy!
3 Things You Should Never Put in Your Safe-Deposit Box โ€” and 6 Things You Should | SafeBee
Valid for casinos
3 Things You Should Never Put in Your Safe-Deposit Box โ€” and 6 Things You Should | SafeBee
Visits
Dislikes
Comments

JK644W564
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 1000

4 Places to Stash Cash in Your Home โ€” and 4 Places Not To. 3 Things You Should Never Put in Your Safe-Deposit Box โ€” and 6 Things You Should;. Cooking Safety.


Enjoy!
3 Things You Should Never Put in Your Safe-Deposit Box โ€” and 6 Things You Should | SafeBee
Valid for casinos
12 things to keep in a safe at home, not at a bank - CBS News
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
A safe-deposit box at a local bank or credit union may be the best place to store hard-to-replace documents, jewelry and other small this web page />But it could be the worst place for certain other items.
Leave these out 1.
The only copy of your will.
No one but you, or a co-signer if you have one, can get into your safe-deposit box.
But if you die or become incapacitated, it can suddenly become a problem.
In some states, notes the American Bar Association, safe-deposit boxes are sealed when queen of the wild free slots owner dies.
Your heirs might need a court order to open the box.
This can result in delays in settling your estate and even cause some of your last wishes to be ignored.
Related: Two other documents to keep out: a living willwhich expresses your wishes regarding medical treatment, and a durable power of attorney or health care proxy, which authorizes someone else to make financial or medical decisions on your behalf if you are incapacitated.
These will be of little value if locked away out of reach.
One alternative is to keep these documents in a secure place at home, such as a fireproof lockbox or safe, and tell a trusted relative or friend where they are.
A safe-deposit box is a smart place to store small valuables, such as heirloom jewelry and rare coins.
Unlike bank and credit union accounts, safe-deposit boxes are not federally insured, so you could be out of luck if your box is tampered with or destroyed in a fire or flood โ€” rare but not unheard-of events.
Your money will be far safer in a federally insured bank or credit union account.
It might even earn some interest.
If you want access tobetter to hide it somewhere at home.
Related: Put these in 1.
An inventory of your household possessions.
Then you know what a hassle it is to replace one.
Into the safe-deposit box it should go, along with the title to your car s.
The originals of your birth certificate and marriage license.
You or your heirs may need them eventually, but probably not so often that you have to keep them at home.
Stock and bond certificates and U.
In some cases, can be replaced, but the process can be difficult and time-consuming.
Before you lock them away, make photocopies or record their serial numbers and file at home.
Valuable jewelry you rarely wear.
A safe-deposit box is a better safety deposit box vs safe for it than a dresser drawer.
Greg Daugherty is a longtime personal-finance writer and a former senior editor of Money magazine.

A7684562
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
60 xB
Max cash out:
$ 500

The truth is, both home safes and safe deposit boxes have pros and cons, and each may be better suited for certain valuable types. Here are a few things to know about the benefits of a home safe vs. a safe deposit box: Weighing Costs Whether you purchase a home safe or a safe deposit box, youโ€™ll have to spend some money.


Enjoy!
Home Safe vs Safety Deposit Box - new-fit.ru
Valid for casinos
3 Things You Should Never Put in Your Safe-Deposit Box โ€” and 6 Things You Should | SafeBee
Visits
Dislikes
Comments

A7684562
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
60 xB
Max cash out:
$ 500

Safe Deposit Box vs. Personal Safe A personal safe, on the other hand, is normally a smaller object located in the home or office of the owner (the larger the box, the more it costs). If not permanently mounted to a solid concrete floor, the safe is subject to being removed from the property with its contents.


Enjoy!
3 Things You Should Never Put in Your Safe-Deposit Box โ€” and 6 Things You Should | SafeBee
Valid for casinos
Home Safe vs Safety Deposit Box - new-fit.ru
Visits
Dislikes
Comments

BN55TO644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 500

For storing cash, gold, silver, a safety deposit box at a bank sounds like a safe thing to do. I've heard that if there is a bank "holiday" and access to ones accounts is not possible, one should still have access to their safety deposity box.


Enjoy!
Home Safe vs Safety Deposit Box - new-fit.ru
Valid for casinos
3 Things You Should Never Put in Your Safe-Deposit Box โ€” and 6 Things You Should | SafeBee
Visits
Dislikes
Comments

BN55TO644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 500

Cost of Using This Box. The price for a Bank of America safe deposit box varies based on its size, and fixed rental fees are charged on an annual basis. โ€“ The rent for the smallest box ranges from $15 to %25; โ€“ A medium box costs $40-65 each year; โ€“ The biggest box is priced between $185 and $500.


Enjoy!
12 things to keep in a safe at home, not at a bank - CBS News
Valid for casinos
3 Things You Should Never Put in Your Safe-Deposit Box โ€” and 6 Things You Should | SafeBee
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
After all, banks have the best 24 hour security and alarm systems.
But the contents of a safe deposit box are rarely insured, while items in your home are typically covered by your homeowner's or renter's insurance policy.
Also, don't think your cash in a safe deposit box is covered under.
The FDIC only insures the deposits in accounts held in banks, but not the contents of their safe deposit boxes.
Bank safe deposit boxes are only accessible during branch operating hours and the boxes are typically sealed when the bank receives a death notice.
To open a sealed safe deposit box, estate representatives are required to provide to the bank.
For these reasons it's good idea to buy a in your home.
What should you keep in it?
Here are a dozen suggestions: 1.
Property insurance policies and agent contact information.
You'll need this here right away if your house suffers damage and you need to know how to file queen of the wild free slots claim.
Passports and original birth certificates.
These can be a hassle to replace and will come in handy to establish identity when traveling with children.
A list of family doctors, prescription medications, and contact information for all pharmacies you use.
You may need these to get new supplies of medications you use on a regular basis.
CDs or an external hard drive containing digital copies of all family photos.
It's a good idea to scan all older family photos and keep a digital copy of them as well.
Your family memories in photographs are irreplaceable.
Safe deposit box keys.
If you store valuables in a bank safe deposit queen of the wild free slots, you'll want to make sure you keep the keys to it in a safe place.
Important papers related to investments, retirement plans, bank accounts, and associated contact information.
You may also want to keep some cash on hand for ready access in an emergency.
Information on your outstanding debts, due dates, and contact information.
It's important to keep tabs on your finances and protect your credit, in the event you're displaced by a fire.
Original Social Security cards.
These can take time to replace and may be needed to establish eligibility for benefits.
Copies of your important legal documents, including powers of attorney, living wills, and health care proxies -- both for yourself and for anyone else for whom you are designated attorney-in-fact or health care surrogate.
Copy of wills and all wills in which you are designated the executor.
It's important to have access to these as safe deposit boxes are typically sealed upon notification of the box owner's death.
Valuables: Jewelry, coins, cash, etc.
Spare Keys and source to all vehicles.
It helps to know where copies are in the case that you need them.
Of course, exactly what you choose to store in your fireproof safe will depend on your personal circumstances and the size and location of the safe.
Ray Martin has been a practicing financial advisor since 1986, providing financial guidance and advice to individuals.
He has appeared regularly as a contributor on the CBS Early Show, CBS NewsPath, as a columnist on CBS Moneywatch.
He has also appeared on the Oprah Winfrey Show and is the author of two books.
Quotes delayed at least 15 minutes.
Market data provided by.
Powered and implemented by.
News provided by The Associated Press.

T7766547
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
50 xB
Max cash out:
$ 200

When I read of the loss from the room safe on the other post, it was the first I have heard of a room safe being broken into. I do believe I would continue to use our room safe, but it's not such a big hassle to use the one at reception.


Enjoy!
Home Safe vs Safety Deposit Box - new-fit.ru
Valid for casinos
12 things to keep in a safe at home, not at a bank - CBS News
Visits
Dislikes
Comments

TT6335644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 500

A safe-deposit box at a local bank or credit union may be the best place to store hard-to-replace documents, jewelry and other small valuables. But it could be the worst place for certain other items. Hereโ€™s a quick run-down of what to keep in โ€” and keep out of โ€” your safe-deposit box. 1. The.


Enjoy!
Home Safe vs Safety Deposit Box - new-fit.ru
Valid for casinos
12 things to keep in a safe at home, not at a bank - CBS News
Visits
Dislikes
Comments